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January 22-27

January 28-February3

This course serves as an overview of a broad spectrum of developmental disabilities, from low incidence to high incidence and provides an opportunity for students to understand the challenges of individuals with developmental disabilities, as well as their teachers, families, and relatives. Students in this course will also learn how teachers, families, and communities support and meet these challenges

Successful college students must be competent readers and writers. The development of this competency requires students to learn to read purposefully and write in a clear and technically proficient manner. College students also need to learn the skills required to properly find, note, and document information used in their writing. In this class, students will read many short essays written in a variety of rhetorical modes. These essays will serve as models for the writing students will be asked to complete.

Successful college students must be competent readers and writers.  The development of this competency requires students to learn to read purposefully and write in a clear and technically proficient manner.  College students also need to learn the skills required to properly find, note, and document information used in their writing.  In this class, students will read many short essays written in a variety of rhetorical modes.  These essays will serve as models for the writing students will be asked to complete.

NCCC ENG1O1
course catalog description

ENG 101 English Composition I --3 credits-- Emphasizes development of the writing process and key skills required in writing clear, concise, and effective essays using various rhetorical devices. Special attention will be given to a research paper requiring MLA documentation. (Prerequisite: ENG 100 or placement examination)
ENG 101 is an introduction to academic writing. Academic writing is about facts and other peoples' ideas—not your life story, likes, or dislikes, etc. We may do a little of that, but mostly we will be working to build on the ideas of others. The cool thing is that you get to decide what the facts mean and what the other people’s ideas say about the question you are trying to answer. You are not always the star on the screen; it’s true. However, you are the “director,” telling all the “actors” (sources) what to do. Note that if you see any interviews with actors, they almost all say that they want to direct. Why do you think that might be?

Academic writing does not have to be boring. After all, there are people out there getting PhDs in Batman Studies! Find your angle on reality and use it to create good writing.

Here are the keys to success in this course (and probably your others as well):

1. Come to class – Every day we will be doing activities that will increase your ability to read and write well and thus do well in this course and others.

2. Do the reading – Each reading has been specifically chosen because A) it is well-written and serves as an example of good writing in different forms and B) because the subject matter concerns elements of our lives that are important to consider.

3. Check your email and our MoodleRoom daily – I will add information to class lessons if something occurs to me or give you tips on an assignment, or I may have an individual question or comment for you. Email is my primary form of communication with you, and the better you stay in contact, the better you will do. I will also use the news forum in the MoodleRoom to keep everyone up to date, so please be sure to check that frequently.

4. Ask for help – While I do not have office hours at the college, I can be reached through email. If you need help, ask. I will make arrangements to meet with you if you need me to. I want to help you to succeed, but I can’t help if I don’t know what’s going on. The Learning Assistance Center on campus is also a resource for you if you need help. The LAC has wonderful tutors available to you for free. There is no reason to be confused or to do badly when there are so many resources to help you.

5. Do your best – Don’t aim for just a passing grade. Aim high.

6. Have fun – Find what interests you in the assignments. If you want to change the focus of an assignment, talk to me. I can be flexible. The more personally invested you are in your writing, the better it will be. I encourage feedback and would like to make the class as interesting as possible.

Important note: This class will require extensive use of a computer, email, and internet. If this is a problem for you in your home environment, you must set aside time to work on internet-connected computers at school, at the public library, or wherever you are able to do so. Not having internet at home is not a excuse for late or missed work or for not checking your college email or the MoodleRoom. Email is an official form of communication at NCCC, and if you do not check it at least once every other day, you will not do well in this class or with other aspects of your college life.

NCCC has determined that the following objectives must be at least minimally attained if a student is to receive credit for ENG 101.

Student Outcomes:
The following objectives must be at least minimally attained if a student is to receive credit for ENG 101.

1. Writing Competencies
a.) Demonstrate the consistent ability 10 write complete, correct, serviceable sentences that exhibit a reasonable degree of structural variety.
1.) Avoid awkward constructions.
2.) Control word order so as to avoid obvious errors of modification.
3.) Avoid sexist language.
4.) Regularly demonstrate the ability to revise and proofread adequately.
b.) Demonstrate the ability to write effective, serviceable paragraphs with clear topic sentences, adequate development, coherence, and unity.
c.) Demonstrate the ability to develop and support a thesis, appeal to various audiences, and use appropriate rhetorical strategies in essays containing four or more paragraphs.
d.) Demonstrate the ability to respond to essay exam questions effectively within a reasonable amount of time.

2. Research Competencies
a.) Demonstrate the ability to research, analyze, and use information from legitimate academic sources to support a thesis.
b.) Demonstrate the ability to properly cite summarized, paraphrased, or quoted information.
c.) Demonstrate the ability to utilize researched information in balance with the writer's own ideas while avoiding plagiarism
d.) Demonstrate the ability to employ the MLA style to document sources.

3. Reading Competencies
a.) Demonstrate the ability to read course texts with reasonable comprehension and precision.
b.) Demonstrate the ability to comprehend, summarize, and paraphrase texts and use them in support of an argument.

Course Assignments and Policies
Short Essays:
Students will write two or three short essays (2-3 pages each) over the course of the semester. Essays will be scored according to a scoring guide that will be made available when the essay is assigned. Short essays will be worth about 20% of your overall grade.

Most of these essays will be revised at least once, based on feedback from your classmates and in-class work, and on feedback from me. Your essay will not receive full credit and may not receive credit at all if it is not revised. Writing is a process as well as a product, and revision is a big part of that process. Once an essay has received a grade, if it was handed in on time, it may be revised again for a potentially higher grade. See me for specific details when appropriate.

Article Responses:
Students will be responding to articles or videos once a week (approximately 15) during the semester. Students will also be required to respond to classmates’ responses. Response and response-to-response guidelines will be posted on the introduction page of the class. Responses and discussion will account for approximately 30% of your grade.


Research Essay: In addition to the above, you will be assigned a longer research essay of 8-10 pages, documented in MLA style and using at least five legitimate academic sources. In this essay you will research a question of your choice and analyze the research in order to come to your own conclusion. We will work on this together, intensively, and, at the end of the semester, you will informally present your research to the class. As with the other assignments, research writing is something we will be learning how to do. I don’t expect you to already know how to do it. The papers will be graded according to a scoring guide, which you will receive. This essay and presentation will be worth approximately 30% of your grade.

Other Assignments: Other assignments will include letter assignments. I will write a letter (to be posted on the assignment page) approximately 4 times during the semester. You will write a letter to me in response (which you will email to me).
Other assignments will also include responses to the readings (I will post these assignments on the assignment page) or any other assignment that is posted in the Moodleroom that is not included in any of the other assignment catagories. You will not be assigned a response for every reading, nor will there be extra assignments posted in the Moodleroom every week. Other assignments will account for 20% of your grade.

Final Exam:
The final exam will be a repeat of the initial writing sample from the first day. I am counting the final research paper as part of the final exam.

Important Note: Plagiarism will not be tolerated!
Your ideas are important – Use them! Don’t “borrow” other people’s ideas unless they are there to support your own and you give them credit using MLA style documentation. On the other hand, please feel free to quote from your classmates’ discussion comments in your writing, as long as you give them credit by naming them in the text. If you have any questions on whether you can use something in an essay or how to do it properly, please ask. Penalties for intentional plagiarism range from failing the assignment to failing the entire course, depending on the severity of the infraction. See the Academic Integrity Policy posted under “resources” in Course Documents on the portal. You can also find it on the Introduction page of the MoodleRoom. Don’t take chances; do your own work!

Attendance Policy:
This is an online class. Your participation in the online assignments, forums, and discussions will count as your attendance. It is important that you participate in the discussions and complete the assignments.
Late Assignments:
Unless an assignment has been turned in on time OR arrangements have been made with me IN ADVANCE of class on the day the assignment is due, the assignment will be considered late. Late assignments will have at least 10 points deducted from the final grade. No assignment will be accepted more than one week late unless special arrangements have been made with me IN ADVANCE. Students are allowed no more than two late assignments during the semester. Any further late assignments will receive a grade of 0. Also, late assignments may not be revised for a higher grade unless revision is specified as part of the assignment.

Participation:
Active participation in writing, reading, and discussion is expected, as that is the main work of the class. Respect and curiosity should guide our interactions in class. Lack of participation will result in the lowering of your grade.

Communication:
I expect you to check your NCCC email at least once a day or every other day. I expect that you will check the MoodleRoom at least once a day or every other day. The schedule on the syllabus has the major readings and assignment due dates, but the assignments may be explained and readings potentially added or changed in class, by email or in the MoodleRoom, so don’t just go by the syllabus. Please feel free to ask questions about anything – email is the best way to get in touch with me. You are required to see me in person to negotiate things you would like to change (assignments, grades, etc.).

To increase fluency in writing, and to support the habit of writing, students will write me a letter 3-4 times throughout the semester. The letters will be graded on how well they meet a set of very basic requirements (which will be given to you), but not on content. They are meant as a means of one-on-one communication between us as well as potentially a place to develop ideas for essays.

Overall Course Grading:
The following is a rough guideline to what various assignments are worth.
Short essays 20%
Research Essay 30%
Article responses, 30%
responses-to-responses,
and moodleroom assignments
Other Assignments (letters, etc.) 20%

Extra Credit: Extra credit will NOT be given upon request; however, there may be opportunities throughout the semester to gain a few points by attending or participating in certain cultural events. Think ahead. If you suspect you will need a few extra points at the end of the semester, jump on these opportunities if and when they are offered.

Elastic Clause:
The Necessary and Proper Clause (AKA “Elastic Clause”) of the U.S. Constitution is as follows:
The Congress shall have Power…To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for
carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this
Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Office thereof.

If it’s good enough for the Constitution, it’s good enough for this syllabus. Basically, this means that I reserve the right to make any changes to this syllabus when such changes will benefit the classes as a whole.

For some reason, I am unable to upload the course syllabus here. Please see the introduction page to review the syllabus.

Successful college students must be competent readers and writers. The development of this competency requires students to learn to read purposefully and write in a clear and technically proficient manner. College students also need to learn the skills required to properly find, note, and document information used in their writing. In this class, students will read many short essays written in a variety of rhetorical modes. These essays will serve as models for the writing students will be asked to complete.

An overview of computer graphics using Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign
An overview of computer graphics using Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign

ECO 102 Introduction to Microeconomics

3 credits

Introductory study of microeconomics, including the domestic economics of the firm, price setting, resource allocations, monopoly, agriculture, and labor relations, inequality and insecurity, and a comparative overview of international economics.



An introduction to the materials and processes of ceramics

Students will be introduced to 3D modeling tools and techniques and will learn essential technical concepts in building, texturing, and lighting 3D forms and modeled environments.  A current 3D modeling application will be used.

An introduction to the materials and processes of painting with acrylic
Speech writing fundamentals and delivery techniques are introduced. Students will also listen to and evaluate speeches presented by others. Students will be acquainted with the minimum theory necessary for speech-making and will be offered practice in delivering a number of speeches, each of which will accomplish a specific goal.

An exploration of the impacts of human behavior and social systems on their environment. 

This course is an introduction to the professional practices and software used in Web site design and maintenance. We will be working primarily with Adobe Dreamweaver CS6.